Welcome to Brotogeris World 

Dedicated to the conservation of Brotogeris Parakeets

Genus Brotogeris
GREY-CHEEKED PARAKEET      


Discovered in 1801, the Grey-cheeked Parakeet is indigenous to northwestern Peru and western Ecuador, living in subtropical regions encompassing dry forests and moist lowland forests.
It is mostly green in color with characteristic gray cheeks and a gray-blue crown. The underside of the wings bears a bright orange swatch between the lesser coverts and the mantle earning them the name "Orange-flanked parakeet", or "Fire-winged parakeet", and the primary flight feathers are normally blue or bluish green in color. Indeed, the species name pyrrhoptera, (lit. flame wing) gives light to these attributes. The average wingspan, length, and weight are 117 mm., 20 cm., and 56 grams, respectively. The average lifespan in captivity is approximately 20 years. Grey-cheeks vocalize quite loudly despite their size. They prefer to build their nests in protected areas such as active termite mounds or tree hollows. It is yet unknown why termites tolerate their presence. Their eggs, which are about 2 cm. x 1.6 cm. are laid in clutches of four to six eggs in a nest padded with moss. The hen will incubate the eggs for about 25-26 days while the male stands guard outside the nest. The grey-cheeked parakeet is endangered and now faces habitat loss. Most populations exist within the homes of private individuals as pets. Because of this, efforts have been undertaken to save this species of Brotogeris endemic to the region.

 ORANGE-CHINNED PARAKEET 

Also known as the Tovi Parakeet. It is found in Columbia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaraqua, Panama, and Venezuela. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, and heavily degraded former forest. like other parrots, it is capable of imitating simple human speech.
The Orange-chinned Parakeet is about 7 inches (17.5 cm) long. It is mainly green and some of the wing feathers are brown/bronze. It has a small clump of bright orange feathers under its beak, hence one of its common names, although the orange feathers may not be visible depending of the parrots posture and the viewing angle. Its beak is horn colored.
The Orange-chinned Parakeet is social and forms a strong pair bond. The nest is in a tree hole. A clutch usually consists of four to six white eggs, which hatch after about 26 days of incubation. Chicks leave the nest about 42 days after hatching. Due to their wide range of habitat, they are not endangered.


CANARY-WINGED PARAKEET 
Brotogeris chiriri) Also known as the Bee Bee parrot, is native to tropical South America south of the Amazon River basin from central Brazil to southern Bolivia, Paraguay and northern Argentina. The bird is 20-25 cm in length, and is mostly light green in color. It has a trailing yellow edge on its folded wings and is also seen when the bird is in flight. The bird feeds mostly on seeds and fruit in its native habitat, and feral populations have adapted to take in blossoms and nectar. Feral birds will also come to bird feeders. Wild birds primarily use disturbed forest and forest clearings around settlements. It rarely uses deep tropical forest. The Yellow-chevroned Parakeet as they are sometimes called, usually find holes in trees to nest in. They will also form nesting tunnels in dead palm fronds. It lays 4-5 eggs. After raising its young, all birds will form rather large communal roosts until the next breeding season. The Canary-winged is surviving well in its natural habitat and feral flocks are doing well in rural areas.                              Photo by Jeanette Leseman

 

 WHITE-WINGED PARAKEET
The White-winged Parakeet is
22 cm in length, and is mostly green in color. It has a trailing yellow edge on its folded wings. Its most distinguished characteristic is the white wing patches most noticed when the bird is in flight. It is closely related to the Yellow-chevroned Parakeet aka Canary-winged. The White-winged Parakeet feeds mostly on seeds and fruit in its native habitat, and feral populations have adapted to take in blossoms and nectar. Feral birds will also come to bird feeders. Wild birds primarily use disturbed forest and forest clearings around settlements. It rarely uses deep tropical forest. The White-winged Parakeet usually finds a hole in a tree to nest in. It may also form a nesting tunnel in a dead palm frond. Clutches usually consist of four to five white eggs, which hatch after about 26 days of incubation. Chicks leave the nest about 45 days after hatching. After raising its young, all birds will form rather large communal roosts until the next breeding season.
 


COBALT-WINGED PARAKEET
The Cobalt-winged Parakeet Is one of the most colorful in the Brotogeris family. It has an orange spot on the chin, just like the Orange-chinned, and a light yellow forehead. As the name describes, the wings are bright blue. It averages 65 grams. It is found in the eastern Andean foothills, the far western Amazonian regions in Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia and Brazil. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and heavily degraded former forest.
 


 









GOLDEN-WINGED PARAKEET
The Golden-winged Parakeet can be found mostly in the eastern Amazon basin, and on the Amazon River to the state of Brazil. In the northeast Basin, the range is contiguous into the Guianas, the Guiana Shield and westwood into eastern Venezuela. It's named for the orange primary coverts. The main colors are deep green with shades of blue. The area above the beak is brown. It is one of the smallest Brotogeris averaging just 52 grams. It has a narrow beak which aids in excavating snails and larvae.



 
TUI PARAKEET:  Is a fairly small green parrot with slightly darker wings, and a medium to short, rather wedge-shaped tail. It has a yellow forehead-spot, a relatively dark reddish-dusky bill, a complete white eye ring, and dull yellowish or whitish irises. There are very few in the USA

PLAIN PARAKEET:  Is mainly green with blue. It is endemic to Brazil. They were never imported into the USA. I know of only one that entered as a pet.   



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